Rescue

Rescue

Rehabilitate

Rehabilitate

Research

Research

Release

Release

Australian Marine Wildlife Research & Rescue Organisation – AMWRRO

Australian Marine Wildlife Research & Rescue Organisation (AMWRRO), providing a rescue and rehabilitation service for our incredibly unique Australian marine wildlife species.

Found an injured marine animal?

All in a Days’ Work

Peter the Southern Giant Petrel released after several weeks on care.

Peter the Southern Giant Petrel released after several weeks on care.

Sunny release after being rescued from the Onkaparinga River and almost lifeless on admission.

Sunny release after being rescued from the Onkaparinga River and almost lifeless on admission.

Southern Giant Petrels, Pelicans and Penguins have all been successfully treated and released over the past few weeks here at AMWRRO.

Sunny the Pelican was rescued from the Onkaparinga River several weeks ago by AMWRRO Volunteer Brinkley and after several weeks of intense treatment she was released by AMWRRO Crew Nicole and Siobhan at her initial rescue location. Special thanks to all those involved in her initial rescue, rehabilitation and release.  

Peter the Southern Giant Petrel was rescued by Wildlife Welfare Organisation and promptly delivered to AMWRRO for long term rehabilitation. After several weeks of care and fattening up this young bird was successfully released south of Adelaide at an isolated beach where it took flight shortly after release.

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Incompetence at its best

Bottlenose Dolphin found at Maslin Beach (photo by Gillian Rayment)

Bottlenose Dolphin found at Maslin Beach (Photo by Gillian Rayment)

Dug up and partly eaten the following morning. (Photo by Gillian Rayment)

Dug up and partly eaten the following morning (Photo by Gillian Rayment)

Recently local residence at Maslin Beach found a dead dolphin that had washed ashore. This was promptly reported to the Department for Environment Water and Natural Resources (DEWNR) for further investigation as it appeared to have some unusual looking wounds near its mouth (one of which could have been caused by an entanglement).

In a classic case of “handballing” the responsibility to another government department; DEWNR Officers contacted the South Australian Museum expecting the Museum to have the ability to correctly investigate and diagnose the cause of death of this animal.

However, the Museum refused to assist and consequently the animal was buried on site by the DEWNR Officer in a shallow grave – so shallow in fact that the evening tide partially exposed the body once again and by day break several dogs had started eating parts of the dolphins’ body – including its head.

This is unfortunately how the DEWNR and the South Australian Museum respond to suspicious marine mammal mortalities in South Australia despite AMWRRO offering on countless occasions to correctly investigate the cause of death and use appropriately qualified personnel to perform such investigations as oppose to how these animals are currently flensed elsewhere.

All it would cost is a phone call…

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World Renowned Artist Emma Hack

A special thanks to the wonderful world renowned artist Emma Hack for her continued support to AMWRRO.

Emma Hack Art Prize is proud to announce the 32 finalists (an extra 2 finalists due to aligning scores) to be exhibited the March at The Adelaide Convention Centre as part of The Adelaide Fringe Festival, 3rd – 30th March.

Emma Hack Art Prize winner will receive $5000 (acquisitive) and an Emma Hack Art Prize sculpture by emerging glass artist Zoe Woods.

People’s Choice Prize winner will receive $2000 thanks to Raw Pearls.

Official Launch of all finalists Wednesday 5th, 6-8pm @ The Adelaide Convention Centre.

Official Presentation of Winners – Invitation Only – Sunday 30th March.

All works (excluding the winner of Emma Hack Art Prize will be available to purchase throughout the exhibition. 15% of all sales to be donated to AMWRRO

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