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Australian Marine Wildlife Research & Rescue Organisation – AMWRRO

Australian Marine Wildlife Research & Rescue Organisation (AMWRRO), providing a rescue and rehabilitation service for our incredibly unique Australian marine wildlife species.

Found an injured marine animal?

Ghost net kills juvenile fur seal and washes ashore on Adelaide Metro Beach

Net found on Semaphore Beach

Net found on Semaphore Beach

Dead fur seal found entangled by its head

Dead fur seal found entangled by its head

AMWRRO receives reports from across Australia of ghost nets float at sea with dead marine animals seen entangled in them – but never has there been one retrieved along Adelaide’s metro beaches with dead marine mammals still entangled.

AMWRRO Crew attended Semaphore beach early this morning and retrieved a net spanning over 80sqm and weighing in at approximately 60kg. Unfortunately this net claimed at least one life that we know of – a young fur seal that was entangled by its head was removed from the net once back at AMWRRO.

This shocking find is a timely reminder of how sensitive our oceans are, especially when something as large as this is found floating around our sensitive coast lines. Several government departments were notified but were not interested in the net or other findings – of which can not be made public as yet.

If nets are found floating at sea please contact your local authority first before attempting to retrieve it from the ocean. These nets can carry hundreds of dead animals around the oceans and can weigh in at several hundred tons; any attempt to attach ghost nets to your recreational vessel can lead to catastrophe and is not recommended.

AMWRRO can also be contacted on 8262 5452 or by email @ info@amwrro.org.au

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Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) visits South Australian shores all the way from the Antarctic pack-ice region.

Young Leopard seal resting on the beach

Young Leopard seal resting on the beach – named snappy!

AMWRRO is currently coordinating the care and protection of a young Leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx) in the states southern  region (named Snappy).

This young animal has several small scars and two open wounds on its face and neck region.  AMWRRO crew have attended and will be monitoring the animal closely over the next few days and flippers crossed the animal will return to the Antarctic waters on its own accord once rested; a very rare animal to have in our waters considering the pack-ice environment in which they normally live in the Antarctic region. 

Please remember there is a 30m no approach zone for any seal on the beach and Leopard seals have a large mouth with very large teeth and they aren’t afraid to use them.

AMWRRO is currently working with the Department for Environment Water and Natural Resources (DEWNR) and will monitor the animal closely over the next few days. If treatment is required the animal may require onsite treatment or risk being euthanased if brought into care.

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Attack of the killer pelicans – or have they been trained to do this?

AMWRRO is currently caring for one of several pelicans that have caused some concern at the River Torrens in Adelaide’s CBD by snatching people’s lunch out of their hands. 

Despite what some may say, this is no fault of the pelicans as these birds are opportunistic feeders and those people that continue to feed them have unfortunately caused this problem (albeit with good intentions).  Everyone must understand that these are wild animals and must be left to fend for themselves as oppose to relying on people for free “hand outs” and therefore, allowing the birds to think that everyone will just hand them food. 

People feeding Pelicans bread at the River Torrens Adelaide CBD.

People feeding Pelicans bread at the River Torrens Adelaide CBD.

Unfortunately the food in which the birds are fed (bread and other human foods) is of poor nutritional value and can cause long term complications for the animals. This includes ducks, swans and other water birds that have become “imprinted” by well-intended people who feed them and who teach children to do the same. 

The bottom line is; if it doesn’t belong to you, don’t feed it.  You will only cause the animal harm in the long run and even death in some cases. 

One adult male pelican was captured earlier today and has been introduced to other in-care pelicans at AMWRRO Wetland Facility on Torrens Island where is will undergo rehabilitation before being released back into the wild at a new location.

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