Rescue

Rescue

Rehabilitate

Rehabilitate

Research

Research

Release

Release

Australian Marine Wildlife Research & Rescue Organisation – AMWRRO

Australian Marine Wildlife Research & Rescue Organisation (AMWRRO), providing a rescue and rehabilitation service for our incredibly unique Australian marine wildlife species.

Found an injured marine animal?

Flippers crossed James makes a full recovery.

James arrives at AMWRRO and is about to be admitted.

James arrives at AMWRRO and is about to be admitted.

Meet James, a young male Australian sea lion rescued from Granite Island (Victor Harbor).

James is fighting a serious infection in his right flipper, he has multiple open wounds scattered over his body, is very underweight and was extremely dehydrated on admission.

Special thanks to Jane a concerned morning walker who found James lying on the Granite Island train tracks and who called AMWRRO for assistance.  AMWRRO contacted Dorothy and Keith C/- the Granite Island Penguin Centre to help keep people away whilst local Department for Environment Water and Natural Resources (DEWNR) Officer Seiji Iwao was travelling from another conservation park to also lend a hand.  

AMWRRO and DEWNR Officers in the Victor Harbor region have successfully worked together over the years to rescue, rehabilitate and release many seals that have found themselves in trouble around the Victor Harbor region.

Flippers crossed James makes a full recovery and we’re able to release him in the near future.   

 

Is this a breach of the Animal Welfare Act 1985? You be the judge.

An adult male Australian sea lion weighing in at over 100kg and one of the world’s rarest seals is shot by a Department for Environment Water and Natural Resources (DEWNR) – National Parks Officers with a .22 CALIBER RIFLE and is then able to “flee” back to the ocean’s high tide line!   

DEWNR Officers once again refused to make the call to AMWRRO for assistance, instead, take to an animal weighing over 100kg with a .22 caliber rifle that is used to shoot animals the size of rabbits!

Is this a breach of the Animal Welfare Act 1985 – the same Act DEWNR is also responsible for implementing on ground; you be the judge!

This Australian sea lion was found sleeping on a resident’s front lawn in the Port MacDonnell Township.  AMWRRO was contacted for advice and images were sent to AMWRRO as requested.  AMWRRO officials explained to the caller that these animals will often find quiet places to sleep for several days before heading back to the ocean to feed. It was explained that the animal looked somewhat thin but by no means emaciated (going by the images that were sent to us).

Large male Australian sea lion sleeping on the grass before being shot

The large male Australian sea lion sleeping on the grass before being shot by DEWNR

AMWRRO contacted DEWNR Officers in the region and requested they attend and confirm the animal was in good health and if not, to contact AMWRRO if the animal required any assistance.

Word soon got out in the town and within an hour many locals went to see the animal for themselves, some of which took a few photos before leaving the animal to rest. 

Several hours later AMWRRO received the terrible news that was witnessed by a shocked local who watched from a distance while the DEWNR – National Parks Officers approached the large male and shot him in the back of the head with a .22 caliber rifle!

Once shot the animal started “running” towards the ocean whist in pursuit by the National Parks Officers. 

Now realizing the animal could most definitely reach the ocean before dying the National Parks Officer contacted Police for much needed assistance.

The animal having already been shot once now waited approximately 45 minutes in extreme pain before being shot two more times with an appropriately powered firearm that ultimately ended his life.

This all taking place within meters of the animal swimming off and dying an extremely slow and painful death by bleeding out in the ocean.

AMWRRO never received a call back by DEWNR Officers once they had inspected the animals’ condition as initially requested.

When questioning a DEWNR Director about this incident recently the subject was soon changed and AMWRRO’s concerns disregarded.

Incompetence at its best

Bottlenose Dolphin found at Maslin Beach (photo by Gillian Rayment)

Bottlenose Dolphin found at Maslin Beach (Photo by Gillian Rayment)

Dug up and partly eaten the following morning. (Photo by Gillian Rayment)

Dug up and partly eaten the following morning (Photo by Gillian Rayment)

Recently local residence at Maslin Beach found a dead dolphin that had washed ashore. This was promptly reported to the Department for Environment Water and Natural Resources (DEWNR) for further investigation as it appeared to have some unusual looking wounds near its mouth (one of which could have been caused by an entanglement).

In a classic case of “handballing” the responsibility to another government department; DEWNR Officers contacted the South Australian Museum expecting the Museum to have the ability to correctly investigate and diagnose the cause of death of this animal.

However, the Museum refused to assist and consequently the animal was buried on site by the DEWNR Officer in a shallow grave – so shallow in fact that the evening tide partially exposed the body once again and by day break several dogs had started eating parts of the dolphins’ body – including its head.

This is unfortunately how the DEWNR and the South Australian Museum respond to suspicious marine mammal mortalities in South Australia despite AMWRRO offering on countless occasions to correctly investigate the cause of death and use appropriately qualified personnel to perform such investigations as oppose to how these animals are currently flensed elsewhere.

All it would cost is a phone call…